Swine Flu Outbreak Beyond Containment; Deaths Mount in Mexico, California, Texas

Swine Flu Outbreak Beyond Containment; Deaths Mount in Mexico, California, Texas
A virulent new strain combining elements of swine flu, human flu and avian flu has leapfrogged past containment measures and is now circulating “in the wild” in Mexico, California and Texas. Up to 60 deaths may have already occurred from the new viral strain called H1N1. Over 1,000 people may have been infected. The CDC does not really know how many are infected, as it’s still very early in the spread of the viral strain and reliable data isn’t yet available.

Importantly, just as I warned NaturalNews readers many times over the last several years, there is no vaccine for this swine flu. Vaccines are virtually useless in any pandemic outbreak because in-the-wild viral strains mutate and become immune to vaccines very quickly. Subscribers who listened to my preparedness audio course released in late 2008 are already prepared with herbal anti-viral medicines, well ahead of the rush: http://www.truthpublishing.com/Heal…

Is this viral outbreak the “big one” that will become a global pandemic? No one knows for sure, but important clues are found in the geographic locations of the current infections: Mexico City, San Diego and San Antonio, Texas. This indicates the virus is already beyond containment and is likely to spread even further. “There are things that we see that suggest that containment is not very likely,” said Dr. Richard Besser from the CDC, in a Reuters report (source below).

The World Health Organization, meanwhile, issued a statement saying “Because there are human cases associated with an animal influenza virus, and because of the geographical spread of multiple community outbreaks, plus the somewhat unusual age groups affected, these events are of high concern.”

The WHO admits the new virus is already resistant to amantadine and rimantadine (two popular anti-viral drugs), but appears to be sensitive to Tamiflu (at least for the moment). Health care workers in Mexico have already been infected by the H1N1 virus, reports the CBC (Canada).

“We have determined that this virus is contagious and is spreading from human to human,” says the CDC on their web site (http://www.cdc.gov/flu/swine/invest…). But they don’t know exactly how contagious the disease really is, or what the fatality rate might be. U.S. residents who were infected have recovered, while many infected people in Mexico have died. It is not yet clear why there is a difference in the survival rate across these two countries.

Notably, the CDC website does NOT report infections unless they are confirmed by CDC laboratories. Thus, the infection numbers on their website (currently showing only 8 cases in the U.S. and 7 in Mexico) are extremely low and do not accurately reflect the real number of infections occurring on the streets. (See link below.)

Symptoms of H1N1 infection include fever, sore throat, muscle pain, coughing and shortness of breath. This can escalate into serious respiratory illness with difficulty breathing and, ultimately, death.

None of the people infected have had contact with swine or birds, according to news reports. This is a clear indication that the disease is being transmitted from human to human.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: